The Great War – Research Notes (3) Plan XVII

I’m researching The Great War for my current work in progress: a historical novel set during that time. To write the period accurately, I’ve been reading and studying the war and the surrounding events. I hope you find these bits of information as interesting as I do!

Like Germany, France had also designed a plan for war far in advance of the outbreak. Their vision was to be clouded by a thirst for revenge. They were still smarting from the loss of their territories in Alsace and Lorraine in the Franco-Prussian War of the 1870’s. And with their recovery in mind, the French committed to the doctrine of the all-out offensive.

In 1911, Plan 16 was adopted. It called for the build up of troops on the Eastern borders of France, quickly followed by a straightforward drive into the lost provinces. This strategy meant the armies would have to cross the Vosges Mountains of Eastern France. The mountains, while not particularly high, are rugged and rough, and at the time, lacked much in the way of communication facilities. It would not be easy country to traverse in the rapid attempt to gain territory.

One man recognized this problem –the new Commander in Chief of the French Army, General Victor Michel. He correctly predicted that a German offensive would come through Belgium, not through the Eastern mountains. He suggested that a new plan be devised that would take the French Army northwest into Belgium to counter the anticipated German move. He was promptly fired.

Michel was replaced by General Joseph Joffre, a large man whose best attributes were patience and a refusal to panic.

Photo_portrait_of_Gen_Joffre
General Joseph Joffre

His version of a plan for war was a modified version of Plan 16, dubbed Plan 17, and kept two armies in reserve to monitor the southern Belgian border. Despite taking a possible German incursion through Belgium into account, the French offensive would still proceed to march through Alsace-Lorraine.

Joffre had made several mistaken assumptions regarding the course of the war: he thought Russian operations would have greater impact, he thought Britain would offer more help at the outset than they did and most tragically, he assumed the Germans had far fewer troops than they did. In fact, despite the early hints that vast numbers of German troops were massing north of the Ardennes, Joffre stuck to his convictions that the enemy didn’t have the manpower to concentrate that far north.

Thus it was that Plan 17 was put into action. On the Eastern offensive, the brightly uniformed French* –wearing the red trousers and navy overcoats of bygone days, their white-gloved officers with swords unsheathed leading the way– would sweep forward in long lines in perfect order. The German machine guns would open up and slaughter them.

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Photo my own – Paris Musee de Armie

This is a brief overview… there is so much more that happened in those opening days of war. I recommend for anyone interested: The Guns of August, by Barbara Tuchman and A Short History of World War I, by James L. Stokesbury. Header Image courtesy History Extra.

*The French quickly realized the folly of their hubris. Their traditional uniform had essentially put targets on their backs. The sky blue uniform which had been suggested in the years prior to the outbreak was rapidly adopted.

10 thoughts on “The Great War – Research Notes (3) Plan XVII

  1. So interesting, Meg, and names and roles come back as I read your post–long-buried info from high school and college history courses. My book club just read The Alice Network, set in WWI, which brought home the truth that spying was glamor-less, distasteful work a lot of the time. We talked about the renewed interest in this era (which makes sense when I think the 100th anniversary of the armistice is this year…). WWII overshadowed WWI in all my learning, so I am, glad of a chance, through writers like you, to explore and learn more about this world-changing event… Will look at the Tuchman book first!

    –Pam

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Pam! My experience is the same with WWII overshadowing WWI. So much of this is all new to me, too. I just started reading The Spy by Paul Coehelo about Mata Hari who was executed for spying. The Tuchman book is excellent!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Lyndy! Truthfully I’m reading waaaaay more than I need to for the book. But I am really interested in this time period so I can’t help myself!

      Like

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