Hitting the wall at 30,000 words…

Two full days. That’s what a weekend should give a writer participating in National Novel Writing Month. (Still hating the acronym). Going into this challenge, I knew I would be losing the first weekend to my excursion to New York City, (Hamilton was off the chart good. All that hype? Absolutely true!) but after that I figured on using the weekends to make up for any writing time I lost during the week due to my practice and my other responsibilities. The weekends ended up being the least productive days that I had… And this particular weekend, I spent three agonizing hours trying to work out a single scene to bring a plot point to conclusion. Three hours = 287 words. Horrendous. And for what? Only to find that I’ve hit a wall… I’m not sure how to write myself to my next point of interest. I may need a break…..

58 thoughts on “Hitting the wall at 30,000 words…

  1. I think you should take a break. I bet it will help. Especially if you consume a giant bowl of ice cream during that break. (Or whatever indulgence you prefer…) πŸ™‚ I wish I had some great advice to offer for real… but I was just stuck for, like, 2 or 3 weeks… and I had no idea how to get out of that. Okay… so this response was totally un-helpful!

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      1. I personally like to plop a scoop of peanut butter into the microwave and pour it over my ice cream. It sort of starts to go back to it’s previous non-melted state once on the cold ice cream, but it’s just yummy. And I am gross.

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  2. I am dying to Hamilton…you lucky girl, I am green! I can imagine the frustration of hitting the wall, I started a book, actually two books, I hit a wall, then was told my book is terrible, I should stick to poetry…haha! One day I will go for it again, meanwhile, I wish you a stunning onslaught of ideas!

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    1. Hamilton was unbelievable. Absolutely brilliant! As far as the book, I’m not liking writing without editing as I go. Thus the agonizing about getting it just so, before moving on. And you absolutely should give it another try! I have trouble believing your book was terrible!

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      1. The editing is not fun! My book was not bad, my friends attitude was! It did effect me though even knowing that he was a narcissist and couldn’t be to see anyone do something that he thought might be good. That’s the ugly truth of it. Now I just don’t have the motivation, maybe soon.

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      2. You know what? Friends and family are sometimes the absolute worst people to get feedback from… It seems to be nearly universal among writers. And no one seems to understand why… I get close to no support at home and have learned not to let it get in the way of soldiering on. If you decide to start that book again, get your blogging friends to give you feedback. I bet you will find much more positive responses!

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      3. That is so true Meg. Too many times there are a lot of other factors that prevent one from getting honest critique from those who are really close. Excellent advice dear lady! Good luck with your book!

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    1. Thank you… I have a lot of trouble not editing as I go. And although the goal is still within reach, I’m not sure I can make up for lost time. And I’d gladly accept help but I’m even sure what to ask for!

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      1. SPOILER ALERT. I’ve introduced the ‘relationship’ earlier than I intended to. When I reached the point I’m at, it just worked, it felt right to bring it into the story, but now I have to adjust how they interact with each other going forward. Not an impossible task, just a rethinking of things. Her crazy family, him moving upstairs…. (this is way ahead of where I am with the stuff I’ve been posting, too.) and of course the shenanigans at the cafe. How much will she let him be involved? Will he feel more entitled to have a say now that they’re a couple? Or will she think he thinks that even if he doesn’t? Because she way overthinks everything… Then again I could just burn the cafe down… Oh that’s horrible!

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      2. Oh no, don’t burn it down!! I find that my planning for things like that (interactions between characters) end up moot because they basically tell me what they’re going to do as scenes play through my head. BUT – if you’re stuck, why don’t you write some sex? I know it won’t be in the novel but it might be fun and it’s still words! πŸ˜€πŸ˜ˆ And I would LOVE to read Maya having sex with him! πŸ˜„ (hee hee) God help him meeting her family!

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      3. I have that happen too. It’s more like a screenplay than a novel. And I have/am considering your suggestion for elsewhere. The family: they will be all about his money and her giving up her dream, etc. I want to write her grandfather (Zada) as her hero within the family. As the patriarch, he will have great influence, once he actually pipes up and takes her side. (The Kaminskys are totally based on my in-laws, btw!)

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      4. Oh yeah! I can totally see them being like, yay! He can support you and you can close the cafe and have babies! She is not gonna like that!! And yes please on the elsewhere!! Your in-laws? Ay! 😳

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      1. I agree. One of the reasons I’m finding the word count so difficult is that my normal method is to edit as I go. This pace really isn’t conducive to that. And yet I can’t help myself! πŸ˜€

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